Gluten and Casein Peptide Test

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  • Gluten and Casein Peptide Test

    • $140.00
    • In stock: N/A
    Gluten / Casein Peptides Test

    The Gluten/Casein Peptides Test can determine the inability to digest wheat, rye, barley, and milk. These undigested proteins, called peptides, are associated with gastrointestinal, neurological, and neuro-developmental disorders.

    Urinary peptides are incompletely broken down pieces of protein. The peptides from gluten and casein can react with opiate receptors in the brain, thus mimicking the effects of opiate drugs like heroin and morphine. These compounds, called neuropeptides, have been shown to react with areas of the brain's temporal lobes that are involved in speech and auditory integration. Neuropeptides also decrease the ability to feel pain and effect cognitive function.

    Most people who have food allergies to milk and wheat also have problems with peptides from these foods interacting with their brain and causing an opiate-like effect. However, some individuals may not show a food allergy to milk or wheat, but have the peptide problem and vice versa. Because of this, we recommend the Gluten/Casein Peptides Test be taken in addition to our food allergy testing.

    Why are Peptides Important?

    The peptides from gluten and casein are important because they react with opiate receptors in the brain, thus mimicking the effects of opiate drugs like heroin and morphine. These compounds have been shown to react with the brain's temporal lobes that are involved in speech and auditory integration.

    Children with autism frequently seem addicted to wheat and dairy products. Presumably, people with autism and schizophrenia incompletely digest wheat and dairy products. These incompletely digested peptides are then absorbed into the body and bind to opiate receptors, altering behavior and other physiological reactions.

    Specimen Requirements

    10 mL of first morning urine before food and drink is preferred. The patient must discontinue soy proteins one week prior to collection of specimen (soy bean oil and soy lecithin are considered acceptable).